Oman

The call to travellers from the coastal country of Oman is strong. A perfect mix of modern, opulent Arabia and traditional Bedouin heritage. But the draw of the sultanate is that though it has so much to offer — from unspoilt beaches to burnt orange deserts and otherworldly topography — it doesn’t boast about it. So whether it’s hurtling at sand dunes, observing endangered turtles nesting, or dolphin-watching in the gulf, every experience will come as an unforgettable surprise.

Delve into sandy plateaus and pristine pools…

While shifting sands may sculpt images in your mind, Oman is more than dunes and lunar moonscapes. One of the most curious calling cards of the Arabian Peninsula, Oman will take you on a journey through intricate oases, winding fishing fjords flanked by sleepy communities, the rippling splendor of the Al Hajar mountain range, and wild beaches awash with orange blossom sands and electric blue waters.

But dramatic landscapes aside, Oman is an open history book. From Muscat’s Grand Mosque with its record-breaking crystal encrusted dome to the ancient crumbling goat trails of Musandam, and the generosity of locals who will push sweet dates into your palms.

The Omani hold tight to their bright traditions and cast a mindful eye to keeping things pure; the skylines showcase only mountains not skyscrapers, and industry lends itself well to time-honoured traditions like pomegranate-picking, tending rose gardens, and fishing in the gin-clear gulf. But a love of authenticity doesn’t mean Oman is closed. Famed for their warm hospitality and peaceful preferences, this is a land where luxury living comes with a personal approach.

A cacophony of cultural experiences, Oman invites you to paraglide into five-star suites, snorkel alongside loggerhead turtles, soak up eclectic energy in the souks, and sleep beneath heavy constellations in the silence of the desert.

While shifting sands may sculpt images in your mind, Oman is more than dunes and lunar moonscapes. One of the most curious calling cards of the Arabian Peninsula, Oman will take you on a journey through intricate oases, winding fishing fjords flanked by sleepy communities, the rippling splendor of the Al Hajar mountain range, and wild beaches awash with orange blossom sands and electric blue waters.

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While shifting sands may sculpt images in your mind, Oman is more than dunes and lunar moonscapes. One of the most curious calling cards of the Arabian Peninsula, Oman will take you on a journey through intricate oases, winding fishing fjords flanked by sleepy communities, the rippling splendor of the Al Hajar mountain range, and wild beaches awash with orange blossom sands and electric blue waters.

But dramatic landscapes aside, Oman is an open history book. From Muscat’s Grand Mosque with its record-breaking crystal encrusted dome to the ancient crumbling goat trails of Musandam, and the generosity of locals who will push sweet dates into your palms.

The Omani hold tight to their bright traditions and cast a mindful eye to keeping things pure; the skylines showcase only mountains not skyscrapers, and industry lends itself well to time-honoured traditions like pomegranate-picking, tending rose gardens, and fishing in the gin-clear gulf. But a love of authenticity doesn’t mean Oman is closed. Famed for their warm hospitality and peaceful preferences, this is a land where luxury living comes with a personal approach.

A cacophony of cultural experiences, Oman invites you to paraglide into five-star suites, snorkel alongside loggerhead turtles, soak up eclectic energy in the souks, and sleep beneath heavy constellations in the silence of the desert.

Reflections from Oman

Discover the “Land of Sands” from our experience makers and fellow escapists

The Desert Experience

“A surprise stag trip for our dear friend, our journey to Oman was an extremely happy experience. The trip was coordinated well by the Blue Sky Escapes team for a large group size of 18. The team arranged custom embroidered Omani dress for the whole group and privately chartered scenic flights above Dubai. The most memorable part of the trip was our time in the Omani desert – we arrived at a private desert camp on camelback, went dune bashing through the desert in jeeps, scaled the dunes, sat by a simple campfire and listened to the intimate life stories by Ali, the Omani camp manager under a starry-filled night. It was truly a wonderful adventure.”

– Ivar Bjorklund

 

An Oman Journey

Get inspired for your perfect escape with this journey previously crafted for a fellow traveller

Immersive Oman Experiences

Oman Travel Tips & Insights

Oman’s dramatic coastline stretches 1,700km from the southeastern tip of the Arabian Peninsula at the Strait of Hormuz to the borders of Yemen in the south. Spread over 309,500 sq km it combines desert dunes, mountains, verdant meadows and vast gravel plains to reach the borders of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the west and the United Arab Emirates in the northeast.

Oman’s national currency is the Omani Rial (OMR), with the lower denominations known as ‘Baisa’. Rial notes range from OMR 1 to OMR 50, while Baisas are available in note form in denominations of 100 and 500 with 1,000 Baisa equating to One Rial. Coins are also available in 5, 10, 25 and 50 Baisa denominations but may not be accepted at all stores and outlets.

Fly into Muscat International Airport either through the national carrier of Oman Air or the handful of Middle Eastern operators such as Emirates, Qatar Airways, and Etihad, which all offer flights with one plane change.

Once in Oman, there are domestic airports located in Salalah, Duqm, Sohar, and Khasab. Currently, there is no rail system. Public buses will get you to the main cities, but they offer limited routes to truly explore the country

For our Singapore visitors, there are 1 stop flights operated by Emirates and Air India. This should take approximately 10 hours.

A visit visa, required by all nationalities except for citizens of Gulf countries, can be obtained by many foreign nationals – including those from the UK, EU, the Americas, Australia and New Zealand – online through the Royal Oman Police website (www.rop.gov.com).

Currently those with a Qatar or Dubai tourist visa may visit Oman without paying for an Omani visa if travelling on direct flights or overland from those countries.

Admission may be refused if you have an Israeli stamp in your passport. Visa regulations change frequently, so check the website for updates.

Non-Muslims travelling by air can bring in two bottles of wine or spirits. It is illegal to cross by land from Oman into the United Arab Emirates and vice versa carrying alcohol. A ‘reasonable quantity’ of cigars, cigarettes and tobacco can be imported. It is illegal to bring in banned substances of any kind, and penalties for possession for drugs and/or weaponry are severe.

Oman has a reliably warm climate and, as long as you avoid the scorching summer months between June and August, can be visited any time. The weather is at its most pleasant from October through to April, when temperatures are warm but cooler than the sweltering summer months and turtles can be seen at Ras al Jinz. Rain is only fleeting and tends only to come in January and February as short, sharp showers. On the south coast, Salalah has a very different climate in that it has a monsoon season, called the khareef. From June to September the khareef’s wet winds create a thick and humid fog which coats the mountains in moisture, creating luxuriant green hills. This provides ideal conditions for Salalah’s abundance of tropical fruit, which is in season throughout the year.

Its dramatic coastline stretches 1,700km from the southeastern tip of the Arabian Peninsula at the Strait of Hormuz to the borders of Yemen in the south. Spread over 309,500 sq km it combines desert dunes, mountains, verdant meadows and vast gravel plains to reach the borders of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the west and the United Arab Emirates in the northeast.

Oman’s national currency is the Omani Rial (OMR), with the lower denominations known as ‘Baisa’. Rial notes range from OMR 1 to OMR 50, while Baisas are available in note form in denominations of 100 and 500 with 1,000 Baisa equating to One Rial. Coins are also available in 5, 10, 25 and 50 Baisa denominations but may not be accepted at all stores and outlets.

Fly into Muscat International Airport either through the national carrier of Oman Air or the handful of Middle Eastern operators such as Emirates, Qatar Airways, and Etihad, which all offer flights with one plane change.

Once in Oman, there are domestic airports located in Salalah, Duqm, Sohar, and Khasab. Currently, there is no rail system. Public buses will get you to the main cities, but they offer limited routes to truly explore the country

For our Singapore visitors, there are 1 stop flights operated by Emirates and Air India. This should take approximately 10 hours.

A visit visa, required by all nationalities except for citizens of Gulf countries, can be obtained by many foreign nationals – including those from the UK, EU, the Americas, Australia and New Zealand – online through the Royal Oman Police website (www.rop.gov.com).

Currently those with a Qatar or Dubai tourist visa may visit Oman without paying for an Omani visa if travelling on direct flights or overland from those countries.

Admission may be refused if you have an Israeli stamp in your passport. Visa regulations change frequently, so check the website for updates.

Non-Muslims travelling by air can bring in two bottles of wine or spirits. It is illegal to cross by land from Oman into the United Arab Emirates and vice versa carrying alcohol. A ‘reasonable quantity’ of cigars, cigarettes and tobacco can be imported. It is illegal to bring in banned substances of any kind, and penalties for possession for drugs and/or weaponry are severe.

Oman has a reliably warm climate and, as long as you avoid the scorching summer months between June and August, can be visited any time. The weather is at its most pleasant from October through to April, when temperatures are warm but cooler than the sweltering summer months and turtles can be seen at Ras al Jinz. Rain is only fleeting and tends only to come in January and February as short, sharp showers. On the south coast, Salalah has a very different climate in that it has a monsoon season, called the khareef. From June to September the khareef’s wet winds create a thick and humid fog which coats the mountains in moisture, creating luxuriant green hills. This provides ideal conditions for Salalah’s abundance of tropical fruit, which is in season throughout the year.

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